Transcription

SEASONAL SMARTS DIGESTOn the road edition: Winter 2016/17This digest uses the previous three years’ worth of actual claims from roads around the country to highlight some of eachseason’s common dangers and provide suggestions to help drivers reduce their risk.You may see some common insurance terms used throughout this report. If you’re unfamiliar with these terms, Farmers hasan easy-to-use glossary of terms at farmers.com/glossary.html.The Seasonal Smarts Digest aims to educate you about:1. What to look out for this season: The insurance industry relies heavilyon history to predict the future. This Farmers digest highlights some ofthe more common seasonal hazards nationally, and demonstrates howregional differences across the country can affect the hazards driversmight face this winter.2. What to think about to help prevent dangers: To help driversprepare for winter, we’ve gathered content from several resources forstraightforward and practical application on the road.WE KNOWFROM EXPERIENCEDon’t use hot water to get a frozenlock open, this can actually makethe problem worse. A de-icerproduct is always a good optionto consider.Did you know? On average, there are about 5.7 million car crashes in the United Stateseach year, and 22 percent are caused by adverse weather conditions or sliding on slick pavement. 1 The average long-distance trip length for Christmas/New Year’s, is 275 miles, compared to 214 miles for Thanksgiving. 2 A La Niña weather pattern could bring colder-than-usual winter weather to the northern half of the United States this year. 3This digest is for information purposes only and provides general tips.Always consult with a licensed insurance professional for insurance coverage information and selection.123Federal Highway Administration: ops.fhwa.dot.gov/weather/q1 roadimpact.htmUnited States Department of Transportation: ications/america on the go/us holiday travel/html/entire.htmlNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration: cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis monitoring/lanina/enso evolution-status-fcsts-web.pdf

Accidents on iceAccidents on icy roads make up alarge percentage of winter claims insome areas. Are you in one of them?Percentage of reported winterclaims involving accidents on ice:7 – 12%4 – 6%1 – 3% 1%WINTER 2016/17For most of the country, the winter months mean sweaters, boots, and hot cocoa. Unfortunately, for many places, they canalso mean slick roads, frozen windshields, and a high potential for accidents. Whether you’re out shopping holiday sales orjust braving an icy commute, watch out for these common winter dangers.Farmers claims data identified three major trouble spots for drivers nationally over the last three years betweenDecember and February:Skidding on iceor snow– 76%*Other vehicle hasright of way – 26%*Theft – 25%*50% decrease betweenqq14% increase in 2015/16pp9% increase in 2015/16ppwinter 2013/14 and 2015/16as compared to 2013/14as compared to 2013/148% increase in winter,pp3% increase in winter,ppas compared to springas compared to spring*Percentage of these claims reported in winter vs other seasons of the year.This digest is for information purposes only and provides general tips. Always consult with a licensed insurance professional for insurance coverage information and selection.

WINTER’S SEASONAL HAZARDSWhile we hope that our tips help keep you and your family safe on the road this winter, we understand that drivers inLos Angeles have a much different experience on the roads than those in Denver or Minneapolis. That’s why we’ve dugdeep into historical claims data to highlight the three biggest hazards drivers face in seven regions across the country.The graphics below indicate the type of claims most likely to occur in a specific part of the country each winter.For example, 31 percent of all comprehensive claims in California, Arizona, Nevada and Utah (the Southwestern region),between December 1 and February 28, resulted from vandalism and mischief.SOUTHWESTPACIFIC NORTHWESTCalifornia, Arizona, Nevada and UtahWashington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana31%*16%*11%*27%*14%*11%*Vandalism& mischiefRear-endaccidentsHit whilelegally parkedCollisionwith animalsRear-endaccidentsHitting an objector pedestrian*of comprehensive claims*of collision claims*of collision claims*of comprehensive claims*of collision claims*of collision claimsMIDWESTSOUTH CENTRALColorado, Nebraska, North and South Dakotaand WyomingTexas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas, New Mexico, Arkansasand Louisiana35%*15%*12%*28%*16%*11%*Collisionwith animalsRear-endaccidentsCollision whilebacking upCollisionwith animalsRear-endaccidentsHitting an objector pedestrian*of comprehensive claims*of collision claims*of collision claims*of comprehensive claims*of collision claims*of collision claimsThis digest is for information purposes only and provides general tips. Always consult with a licensed insurance professional for insurance coverage information and selection.

WINTER’S SEASONAL HAZARDSContinuedSOUTHEASTGREATER GREAT LAKESAlabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North andSouth Carolina and TennesseeIowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohioand Wisconsin29%*16%*9%*46%*15%*13%*Collisionwith animalsRear-endaccidentsCollision whilebacking upCollisionwith animalsRear-endaccidentsHitting an objector pedestrian*of comprehensive claims*of collision claims*of collision claims*of comprehensive claims*of collision claims*of collision claimsMID-ATLANTICNEW ENGLANDNew York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland,Washington D.C., Virginia and West VirginiaConnecticut, Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire,Massachusetts and Rhode Island43%*13%*12%*26%*12%*12%*Collisionwith animalsRear-endaccidentsHit whilelegally parkedCollisionwith animalsHitting an objector pedestrianRear-endaccidents*of comprehensive claims*of collision claims*of collision claims*of comprehensive claims*of collision claims*of collision claimsThis digest is for information purposes only and provides general tips. Always consult with a licensed insurance professional for insurance coverage information and selection.

WINTER ROAD TIPSTo help avoid accidents like these, Farmers has compiled tips for you to consider to help keep you and your family safeon the road:Before you go Prepare your car for winter. Check your tires and windshield wipers tomake sure they’re in good condition, and fill your wiper fluid reservoirwith a no-freeze product. Keep extra wiper fluid in your car, alongwith an ice scraper, a blanket, jumper cables, and other emergencyessentials. Do your front and rear defrosters work?You’ll probably need them!WE KNOWFROM EXPERIENCEBe sure your battery is fully charged.It’s harder to jump start a cold car if thebattery wears out. Everybody likes a warm car, but leaving your parked car running,unattended, could lead to vehicle theft—or a ticket. “Puffer” cars are illegal in some cities and states. Don’t leave until you’ve cleared all snow and ice off your vehicle, including your windshield, windows and roof. “Peepholedriving” through a small cleared spot on your windshield reduces visibility and makes driving more dangerous, especiallyon icy or snow-packed roads. Snow and ice sliding off the roof can cause a hazard for other drivers on the road. Remember to stay cautious. Even if you’re driving carefully in icy conditions, there’s no guarantee that other drivers aredoing the same. Stay aware and avoid distractions, especially your phone. Don’t drink and drive. The winter holidays bring plenty of opportunities for celebrating, but driving while impaired makesdicey roads even more dangerous. According to Mothers Against Drunk Driving4, there were 846 drunk driving fatalitiesbetween Thanksgiving and New Year’s Eve in 2013. Designate a sober driver, consider using a rideshare option or call a taxiif you’ve had too much to drink.While you’re driving Slow down. Tires lose their grip more easily on wet and icy roads, which increases your chances of skidding when braking,turning, or accelerating. Reducing your speed gives you more time to react in case you slide, potentially avoiding a collision. Recognize the limits of front-wheel, rear-wheel, four-wheel and all-wheel drive. All cars, no matter what type of drive they’reequipped with, will still skid on ice, potentially resulting in an accident. Slowing down is important for all drivers. Know how to correct a slide. If you start skidding during a turn, gently let off on the accelerator and turn the steering wheelin the direction of the slide to help straighten out the car. Watch out for unique winter hazards. During cold weather, bridges and overpasses are often the first areas to become icy,so use extra caution or plan a route that avoids them. Passing snow plows and sand trucks can also be dangerous: theirdrivers’ visibility is often reduced, so they may not see you. Stopped or stalled in winter weather? Safely consider putting bright markers on your car, avoid overexertion, and don’t runyour car for a long time with the windows up. If you need the engine on to stay warm, make sure the exhaust pipe is clear ofsnow and turn the car on every few minutes—just long enough to provide a bit of heat.4Mothers Against Drunk Driving: -nationwide-urge-the.htmlThis digest is for information purposes only and provides general tips.Always consult with a licensed insurance professional for insurance coverage information and selection.

WINTER 2016/17 For most of the country, the winter months mean sweaters, boots, and hot cocoa. Unfortunately, for many places, they can also mean slick roads, frozen windshields, and a high potential for accidents. Whether you’re out shopping holiday sales or just braving a